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Wednesday, August 24, 2016



BROKE MY ARM, CAN'T TYPE.  MAYBE BACK ON LINE IN A WEEK.

BOUNCING BET

BOUNCING BET AT THE BEACH...

PETALS NOTCHED...

RECEPTACLE ENLARGED, LEAVES OPPOSITE
Wednesday, 8:00 AM.  69 degrees F at the ferry dock, 65 0n the back porch.  Sky overcast. Wind variable and mostly calm, humidity 88%, barometer 27.78", steady at present. High around 80 today, then cooling, with a chance of rain on the weekend.
   Bouncing bet, Saponaria officinalis, in the Chickweed Family (Caryophyllaceae), is a European garden escapee that naturalizes along roadsides and other places.  It has five white notched petals  tinged with pink or sometimes all pink.  Another common name is soapwort, since its sap mixed with water lathers into a gentle soap.

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN GLORIFIETH EVERYONE

 
        
        THE ODE GARDEN IN LATE SUMMER






                      THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN

Our England is a garden that is full of stately views, 
Of borders, beds and shrubberies and lawns and avenues, 
With statues on the terraces and peacocks strutting by; 
But the Glory of the Garden lies in more than meets the eye. 

For where the thick laurels grow, along the thin red wall, 
You will find the tool- and potting-sheds which are the heart of all; 
The cold-frames and the hot-houses, the dungpits and the tanks, 
The rollers, carts and drain-pipes, with the barrows and the planks. 

And there you'll see the gardners, the men and 'prentice boys 
Told off to do as they are bid and do it without noise; 
For, except when seeds are planted and we shout to scare the birds, 
The Glory of the Garden it abideth not in words. 

And some can pot begonias and some can bud a rose, 
And some are hardly fit to trust with anything that grows; 
But they can roll and trim the lawns and sift the sand and loam, 
For the Glory of the Garden occupieth all who come. 

Our England is a garden, and such gardens are not made 
By singing:--"Oh, how beautiful!" and sitting in the shade, 
While better men than we go out and start their working lives 
At grubbing weeds from gravel-paths with broken dinner-knives. 

There's not a pair of legs so thin, there's not a head so thick, 
There's not a hand so weak and white, nor yet a heart so sick, 
But it can find some needful job that's crying to be done, 
For the Glory of the Garden glorifieth every one. 

Then seek your job with thankfulness and work till further orders, 
If it's only netting strawberries or killing slugs on borders; 
And when your back stops aching and your hands begin to harden, 
You will find yourself a partner in the Glory of the Garden. 

Oh, Adam was a gardener, and God who made him sees 
That half a proper gardener's work is done upon his knees, 
So when your work is finished, you can wash your hands and pray 
For the Glory of the Garden, that it may not pass away! 
For the Glory of the Garden, that it may not pass away! 
Tuesday, 8:00 AM. 69 degrees F at the ferry dock, 65 on the back porch. Wind SW, calm with light gusts.  The sky is clear, the humidity 84%.  The barometer is falling, now at 29.90," predicting rain tomorrow with cool and pleasant weather Thursday and Friday.
  Kipling is one of my favorite author/poets, and a great connoisseur of gardens, although I doubt he would have thought much of ours. 

Monday, August 22, 2016

ROUND LEAVED DOGWOOD

ROUND LEAVED DOGWOOD BERRIES,,,

...RIPE NOW...

FLOWER HEADS AND DISTINCTIVE LEAVES (Google photo)...

...FALL LEAF COLOR (Google photo)
Monday, 7:45 AM.  60 degrees F at the ferry dock, 56 on the back porch.  Wind SW, mostly calm with occasional light gusts.  The sky is clear with a few clouds here and there, the humidity 84%.  The barometer is falling some, now at 29.97". Highs will be around 80 today and tomorrow, then cooling with a chance of a thunderstorm Wednesday.
   I am more and more impressed with the native round leaved dogwood, Cornus rugosa, in the Dogwood Family (Cornaceae).  An under story shrub of deciduous and coniferous forests of the  north, it grows in full sun to semi-shade.  It flowers well, has fine orange to pink to red fall leaf color, and interesting, beautiful berries, just now ripening.  The bluish white to lead colored berries are borne on  red pedicels which may also have red aborted berries, all very pleasingly colorful.  Round leaved dogwood has opposite leaves and maroon colored branches and distinctively veined, entire leaves.
   I have used this shrub more and more in landscaping, and find it beautiful and dependable.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

BUDDY AT THE BEACH

BUDDY ON POINT AT THE BEACH...
WHAT'S UP? A FAMILY OF MALLARDS...
...BUT I DON'T HAVE WEBBED FEET!...
...I'LL JUST GO AND FIND A DEER LEG BONE INSTEAD!
Sunday, 8:00 AM.  61 degrees F at the ferry dock, 56 on the back porch.  Wind variable, mostly calm with occasional light gusts.  The sky is clear with some scattered white clouds, after yesterday's .6" of rainfall, the humidity 82%.  The barometer is rising somewhat, now at 29.84".  The forecast is for cooler and partly cloudy weather in the week ahead, with a chance of a thunderstorm midweek.
   Yesterday being a rainy day, I took Buddy for a run on the beach before dinner.  He went on a solid point at the mouth of the Sioux River, the object of his rigidity being a family of mallard ducks.  He went in the water but he doesn't have webbed feet and the current is strong.  So like any intelligent being, he went inead  and did what he can do well; he found a deer leg bone.
OFF THE CUFF
   We watch a lot of baseball, and have noticed the gradual reduction of  African American players (and a corresponding increase in Hispanic players). Now,  baseball is far from a mirror image of America, but if one is a fan it is offers vignettes of our population, culture and history.  Currently, about 8% of MLB players are black, down from 16% a few years back.
   Many reasons have been given for that decline...i.e., the popularity of basketball in the inner cities, the decline of baseball as a sport in general, etc.  But upon further consideration of the statistics, I believe that it mirrors the decline of the African American population in America.  The black population is now 13.2% of the American total.  6.6% would be the natural percentage of the male black population, so 8% is actually a pretty healthy percentage of that population playing in Major League Baseball.  I remember not long ago when the prediction was that it would be only a generation or two and the country would be more than 50% African American.  What happened to that statistical trend, which was based on birth rate?
   Crime, black on black murder, drug addiction and abortion, which are mainly the results of poverty and the breakdown of black families, have decimated the black population.  How that gets turned around is primarily up to the black community, but it seems to me it has to start with personal redemption, saving families, and throwing off the suffocating cloak of dependency and victimhood fostered by the liberal-progressive movement of the past sixty years.
   Without sincere and rapid change, sparked by the black community and supported by the government and the rest of American society, it appears that African Americans will continue to disappear from not only baseball but from all of American life.

Saturday, August 20, 2016

COMMING SOON: DEDICATION OF BAYFIELD'S FIRST HERITAGE TREE


Saturday, 8:15 AM.  68 degrees F at the ferry dock, 61 on the back porch.  Wind variable and mostly calm, with occasional light gusts.  The sky is overcast and it is raining lightly and looks like it will do so most of the day.  The humidity is 91% and the barometer is still falling, currently at 29.69".  The forecast is rain today, clearing tomorrow and early in the week, with possible rain by Wednesday.  What a growth year this has been!  The gardens and the entire countryside are lush and green and productive.

DEDICATION OF BAYFIELD’S FIRST HERITAGE TREE
1:00 PM SUNDAY, AUGUST 28
MANYPENNY AVE. AND S. SECOND ST
 
150 YEAR OLD RED OAK

​   
The City of Bayfield Tree Board, the Mayor and Common Council, have designated the first Bayfield Heritage Tree.  It is a red oak, Quercus rubra, located on the west side of South Second Street, just north of Manypenny Ave.  Probably planted about the time the brick paved street was plated, it is 42" in diameter at breast height, and about 75 feet tall.  Around 150 years old, it looks sound and healthy.  
   The street was just restored, the brick pavers taken up and re-laid, and new curbs installed, all done with care around the tree.  Tree Board members fertilized the tree with fertilizer stakes at their  September, 20015 meeting and the tree has been well watered and received plenty of rain since.
   The intent of the Heritage Tree program is to memorialize City of Bayfield street and park trees  that are important historically, environmentally or horticulturally, and to educate the public concerning their importance.  Trees so designated will receive extra care and attention to help ensure their health and welfare.
   This first Heritage Tree will be dedicated as part of the 2016  Bayfield  Home Coming event at 1:00 PM on Sunday, August 28, 2016.
    The program will begin with a welcome by Bayfield Mayor Gordon Ringberg.    A poem about trees will be read by Bayfield author Howard Paap.
    Volunteer City Forester Art Ode will say a few words about the Tree Board, the Heritage Tree program, and its purpose and history.
    Members of the Tree Board will be recognized, as will former Volunteer City Forester Howard Larsen.
    Refreshments will be served at the Pavilion after the event.
   
  

Friday, August 19, 2016

THE KIYI VISITS BAYFIELD

THE KIYI...

...A UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY SHIP...

...CONDUCTS LAKE SUPERIOR FISHERIES RESEARCH...

...BASED IN ASHLAND, THE KIYI WAS DOCKED YESTERDAY IN BAYFIELD

Friday, 7:45 AM. 68 degrees F at the ferry dock, 63 on the back porch. Wind variable and calm with light gusts.  It is raining steadily, and the sky is overcast.  The humidity is 92%, the barometer is at 29.80" and relatively steady.  Rain is forecast for today and tomorrow, then clearing on Sunday, with a chance of rain again on Wednesday.
   Another large ship was docked in Bayfield yesterday.  The United States Geological Service fisheries research vessel, the KIYI, is based in neighboring Ashland but I had never seen it before.
   Commissioned in 2000, the KIYI is 107 feet in length and is equiped with a large boom and trawling nets.  It has a crew of three and can accommodate six researchers.  It operates primarily on Lake Superior in the Apostle Islands region, sampling and studying whitefish and lake trout populations.
   KIYI are a species of Lake Superior deep water whitefish.
OFF THE CUFF
   We watched a major policy address by Donald Trump yesterday.  It occurred in Raleigh, North Carolina.  Trump spoke, I thought, extremely well about the challenges the country faces, his policy solutions, and his desire to unite the nation as one people to solve its problems.  He was emotional but controlled, and his demeanor was decidedly presidential.  He was enthusiastically received by a very large crowd.
   I have seen little or nothing regarding the rally or his speech anywhere on the internet news, which has been overtaken with the story of the stupid misbehavior of four US Olympic swimmers (if they weren't robbed in the first place, they sure have been by now).
   I don't think the media would give Donald Trump substantive or fair coverage even if he descended from the heavens, accompanied by hosts of trumpeting angels.